28 11 / 2011

thedailywhat:

Early Bird Special: Necessity may be the mother of invention, but this leaf-blower-powered office chair was clearly raised by its fun uncle Boredom. 

[sisfti.]

(Source: thedailywhat)

13 11 / 2011

(Source: icanread, via babelogue)

05 11 / 2011

thedailywhat:

OMG! Adorbz of the Day: The mother of the best kid to be tricked by Jimmy Kimmel’s Halloween challenge — you know who I’m talking about — uploaded the full video of her awesome son’s precocious reaction to learning that all his treats are gone.

[ontd.]

(Source: thedailywhat)

22 10 / 2011

vintageanchor:

Old book smell.  Did you know?
“Lingnin, the stuff that prevents all trees from adopting the weeping habit, is a polymer made up of units that are closely related to vanillin.  When made into paper and stored for years, it breaks down and smells good.  Which is how Divine providence has arranged for secondhand bookstores to smell like good quality vanilla absolute, subliminally stoking a hunger for knowledge in all of us.”
—Perfume: The Guide.

vintageanchor:

Old book smell.  Did you know?

“Lingnin, the stuff that prevents all trees from adopting the weeping habit, is a polymer made up of units that are closely related to vanillin.  When made into paper and stored for years, it breaks down and smells good.  Which is how Divine providence has arranged for secondhand bookstores to smell like good quality vanilla absolute, subliminally stoking a hunger for knowledge in all of us.”

—Perfume: The Guide.

(Source: vintageanchorbooks)

17 10 / 2011

justbesplendid:

cosy..

17 10 / 2011

westandwiththe99percent:

I have inherited an amount of money that is [much] more than I need.
I AM THE 1%
My taxes are at a historical low, and the influence of money on our government is at a historical high. These are not good things!
So what am I doing about it?
(1) I am donating the vast majority of my money to social change [organizations].
(2) I am personally advocating for the repair of our broken system.
I STAND WITH THE 99%
I am part of Occupy Boston. My money gives me no special influence here. That’s the way it should be.

westandwiththe99percent:

I have inherited an amount of money that is [much] more than I need.

I AM THE 1%

My taxes are at a historical low, and the influence of money on our government is at a historical high. These are not good things!

So what am I doing about it?

(1) I am donating the vast majority of my money to social change [organizations].

(2) I am personally advocating for the repair of our broken system.

I STAND WITH THE 99%

I am part of Occupy Boston. My money gives me no special influence here. That’s the way it should be.

10 10 / 2011

10 10 / 2011

Thinking about getting an owl like this for my next tattoo.

Thinking about getting an owl like this for my next tattoo.

04 10 / 2011

thedailywhat:

Meet The New Muppet of the Day: Sesame Street is set to add a new member to its roster of friendly, fuzzy characters: Lily, the 7-year-old “food insecure” Muppet.
Lily — who represents the 17 million children for whom access to food is uncertain — will be introduced to viewers during an upcoming Sesame Street special about hunger in America.
“We thought long and hard about how do we really represent this from a child’s point of view?,” said Sesame Workshop’s senior vice president for outreach and educational practices Jeanette Betancourt. “We felt it was best to have this new Muppet take this on in a positive way and a healthy way.”
Everything from Lily’s clothing to her voice and mannerism has been geared towards making her as realistic and empathetic as possible. “She wants to talk about this topic,” says Betancourt, ““because she knows it will help many other families and children, but it isn’t an easy topic to talk about in the first place.”
“Growing Hope Against Hunger” is scheduled to air this Sunday on PBS.
[artsbeat.]

thedailywhat:

Meet The New Muppet of the Day: Sesame Street is set to add a new member to its roster of friendly, fuzzy characters: Lily, the 7-year-old “food insecure” Muppet.

Lily — who represents the 17 million children for whom access to food is uncertain — will be introduced to viewers during an upcoming Sesame Street special about hunger in America.

“We thought long and hard about how do we really represent this from a child’s point of view?,” said Sesame Workshop’s senior vice president for outreach and educational practices Jeanette Betancourt. “We felt it was best to have this new Muppet take this on in a positive way and a healthy way.”

Everything from Lily’s clothing to her voice and mannerism has been geared towards making her as realistic and empathetic as possible. “She wants to talk about this topic,” says Betancourt, ““because she knows it will help many other families and children, but it isn’t an easy topic to talk about in the first place.”

“Growing Hope Against Hunger” is scheduled to air this Sunday on PBS.

[artsbeat.]

(Source: thedailywhat)

04 10 / 2011

vintageanchor:

1.Of Henry James, Mark Twain said, “Once you’ve put one of his books down, you simply can’t pick it up again.”

2. In response to reading Benito Mussolini’s “The Cardinal’s Mistress”, Dorothy Parker said, “this is not a novel to be tossed aside lightly. It should be thrown with great force.”

3. Of George Meredith, Oscar Wilde said, “as a writer he has mastered everything except language; as a novelist he can do everything except tell a story; as an artist he is everything except articulate­.”

4. “Moby Dick” was largely a dud when it was published, and most of the critics were scathing. One reviewer dismissed Melville’s magnum opus as “sheer moonstruck lunacy.”

5. “Wuthering Heights” was universally panned, and Emily Brontë read every single review before her untimely death prevented her from knowing that the book would someday be considered a masterpiece. The first review published in January 1848 by the Atlas calls it a “strange, inartistic story…[that] is inexpressibly painful.” The reviewer describes every character in the book as “hateful or thoroughly contemptible.” The Examiner dismissed it as “strange” as well as “wild, confused; disjointed, and improbable.” But Graham’s Lady Magazine really dug in: “How a human being could have attempted such a book as the present without committing suicide before he had finished a dozen chapters, is a mystery. It is a compound of vulgar depravity and unnatural horrors.”

6. Gore Vidal said of Hemingway, “What other culture could have produced someone like Hemingway and not seen the joke?”

7. Randall Jarrell’s one sentence review of a forgettable book of poetry: “This reads like it was written on a typewriter­—by a typewriter­.”

8. H.L. Mencken managed to pan one of his closest friends, Theodore Dreiser: “An Indiana peasant, snuffling absurdly over imbecile sentimenta­lities, giving a grave ear to quackeries­, snorting and eye-rollin­g with the best of them.” He called The Great Gatsby a “glorified anecdote.”

9. At more than 2,000 pages, here’s what The New Yorker had to say about James Michner’s CHESAPEAKE: “I have two recommendations. First, don’t buy this book. Second, if you buy this book, don’t drop it on your foot.”

10. Edmund Wilson wrote: “Mr. Nabokov is in the habit of introducin­g any job of this kind which he undertakes by the announceme­nt that he is unique and incomparab­le and that everybody else who has attempted it is an oaf and ignoramus, usually with the implicatio­n that he is also a lo-class person and a ridiculous personalit­y.”

11. A favorite from Norman Mailer on J.D. Salinger’s FRANNY & ZOOEY: “The greatest mind ever to stay in prep school.”

12. Alexander Woollcott once reviewed a self-published book of poetry called “And I Shall Make Music” with: “Not on my carpet, lady.”

(Source: vintageanchorbooks)